Category Archives: MORTALITY MECHANIC’S MANUAL

HUBRIS – THE HUMAN TRAGEDY

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Definition of hubris: exaggerated pride or self-confidence.

Human beings, with rare exceptions, do not confront their own mortal frailty.  Humans die. Only spirits are immortal. A human is an immortal spirit who temporarily animates a fragile body.  The tragedy of humans is their failure to be the spirit they really are.

The English language picked up both the concept of hubris and the term for that particular brand of cockiness from the ancient Greeks, who considered hubris a dangerous character flaw capable of provoking the wrath of the gods. In classical Greek tragedy, hubris was often a fatal shortcoming that brought about the fall of the tragic hero. Typically, overconfidence led the hero to attempt to overstep the boundaries of human limitations and assume a godlike status, and the gods inevitably humbled the offender with a sharp reminder of his or her mortality.

To the Greeks, hubris referred to extreme pride, especially pride and ambition so great that they offend the gods and lead to one’s downfall. Hubris was a character flaw often seen in the heroes of classical Greek tragedy, including Oedipus and Achilles. The familiar old saying “Pride goeth before a fall” is basically talking about hubris. —  Merriam-Webster Dictionary

HEAVEN IS BORING

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HEAVEN IS BORINGMortality Mechanics' Manual

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~ from the book “Mortality Mechanics Manual

“I am not The One. I am not The Creator. Yet, I am holy and sacrosanct. I am more important and more powerful than The Gods. Why? You say that I am!  I control your existence. Why?  Because I promised you relief from eternal boredom, from the perpetual responsibility of self-amusement. Therefore, you follow my instruction without question.

Why? Because you claim you cannot bear to endure Eternity as The One.  You offer me your trust and praise. You submit yourself to pain, anguish, amnesia and mystery. Why?  Because you choose Not To Be. Your stupidity is its own reward and punishment.  Your decadence ensures your slavery.  Mortality is the key to your prison.”

“Do you desire Immortality? Do you desire to break the cycle of birth, life, pain, death, rebirth and endless, unwinnable games in the physical universe?

You must decide to Be Nothing. Be responsible for your own Boredom. Create Your Own Universe. Disagree with Agreement. Admire Your Self. Create and find Joy in your games, your dreams, your illusions.

Can you hover over a mountaintop for ten thousand years? Can you pretend, like a child, that your best friend is a ghost? Can your best friend be You?

The solution to Mortality is Being You:  The Immortal Creator.”

SUICIDE IS PAINLESS

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suicide is painlessAs people grow older conditions of life often become increasingly painful.  We must decide for ourselves when the game is over, and consider our options. The lyrics to this song repeat the timeless question: to be, or not to be? Who should answer the question:  You or the body you animate?

 Lyrics to the song “Suicide is Painless” by Mike Altman
is the theme song for both the movie and TV series M*A*S*H.  Mike Altman is the son of the original film’s director, Robert Altman, and was 14 years old when he wrote the song’s lyrics.

THE NEXT WORLD

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PLATO — 348/347 BC) was a Classical Greek philosophermathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the foundations of Western philosophy and science.[3] In the words of A. N. Whitehead:

“The safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition is that it consists of a series of footnotes to Plato. I do not mean the systematic scheme of thought which scholars have doubtfully extracted from his writings. I allude to the wealth of general ideas scattered through them.

Plato’s sophistication as a writer is evident in his Socratic dialogues; thirty-six dialogues and thirteen letters have been ascribed to him. Plato’s writings have been published in several fashions; this has led to several conventions regarding the naming and referencing of Plato’s texts.[5] Plato’s dialogues have been used to teach a range of subjects, including philosophylogicethicsrhetoric, and mathematics. Plato is one of the most important founding figures in Western philosophy. — Wikipedia.org