Category Archives: MORTALITY MECHANIC’S MANUAL

SURVIVING ETERNITY

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ONE KNOWS

ONE DOES NOT DISCUSS ETHICS
WITH A SNAKE WHEN IT STRIKES.

ONE DOES NOT SEEK JUSTICE
IN THE JAWS OF A SHARK.

BANKERS, SOLDIERS, POLITICIANS,
AND PRIESTS WORK TOGETHER AS A TEAM.

POWER, CONTROL AND POSSESSION
ARE THEIR NATURAL SCHEME.

BEINGS OF GOOD WILL TREAT EACH OTHER
AS THEY WOULD BE TREATED THEMSELVES.

EVERY CREATURE SURVIVES
ACCORDING TO ITS KIND.

GOOD AND EVIL ARE SEEN THROUGH
THE EYES OF PREDATORS AND PREY.

SURVIVAL IS AVOIDING PAIN.
PLEASURE IS LOVE ETERNALLY.

ONE KNOWS THAT SURVIVAL IS A GAME
THAT IMMORTAL SPIRITS CANNOT PLAY
UNLESS THEY FORGET THAT THEY ARE THEY.

______________________________

Lawrence R. Spencer. 2013.

EXISTENTIAL ENNUI

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“When we carefully examine every instant of our personal existence we  discover that we created it, agreed with it and willingly participated with others to cause it to continue to exist.  Why? Boredom. Nothingness.  Our individual and collective unwillingness to admit that we are actively creating everything that we perceive.

Yet, this simple recognition of our personal responsibility for the existence of this universe, and all universes and of our own eternal nothingness is the solution to the Mystery of the Ages.  Every question provides its own reply: What is Mystery? The Mystery is that there is no mystery. We create mystery by choosing to Not Know and to Not Be the Eternal Nothingness of Our Selves.

Do you desire Immortality?  Do you desire to break the cycle of birth, life, pain, death, rebirth and endless,  unwinnable games in the physical universe?  You must decide to Be Nothing. Be responsible for your own Boredom. Create Your Own Universe. Disagree with Agreement. Admire Your Self. Create and find Joy in your games, your dreams, your illusions. Can you hover over a mountaintop for ten thousand years?  Can you pretend, like a child, that your best friend is a ghost?  Can your best friend be You? The solution to Mortality is Being You:  The Immortal Creator.”

— Excerpt from the new book MORTALITY MECHANIC’S MANUAL, by Lawrence R. Spencer

THE LAMENT

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The Lament by Hermes Trismegistus, translated from Ficino by Dame Frances Amelia Yates (1899 – 1981)

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“There will come a time when it will be seen that in vain have the Egyptians honored the divinity with a pious mind and with assiduous service. All their holy worship will become inefficacious. The Gods, leaving the earth will go back to heaven; they will abandon Egypt; this land, once the home of religion, will be widowed of its gods and left destitute.

Strangers will fill this country, and not only will there no longer be care for religious observances, but, yet a more painful thing, it will be laid down under so-called laws — under pain of punishments — that all must abstain from acts of piety or cult towards the gods. Then this Holy Land, the home of sanctuaries and temples, will be covered with tombs and the dead.

ThothOh, Egypt! Egypt, there will remain of the religion only fables, and thy children in later times will not believe them; nothing will survive save words engraved on stones to tell of thy pious deeds!

The Scythian, or the Indian, or some other such barbarous neighbor will establish himself in Egypt. For behold the divinity goes back up to heaven; and men, abandoned, all die, and then, without either god or man, Egypt will be nothing but a desert.

Why weep, O Asclepius? Egypt will be carried away to worse things than this; she will be polluted with graver crimes. She, hitherto most holy, who so much loved the gods, only country of Earth where the gods made their home in return for her devotion — she who taught men holiness and piety — will give example of the most atrocious cruelty.

In that hour, weary of life, men will no longer regard the world as (angel) worthy object of their admiration and reverence. This All, which is a good thing, the best that be seen in the past, the present, and the future, will be in danger of perishing, men will esteem it a burden; and thenceforth they will despise and no longer cherish this whole of the universe, incomparable work of God, glorious construction, good creation, made up of an infinite diversity of life forms, instrument of the will of God who, without envy, pours forth his favour on all his work, in which is assembled in one whole, in harmonious diversity, all that can be seen that is worthy of reverence, praise and love.

For darkness will be preferred to light; it will be thought better to die than to live; none will raise his eyes towards heaven; the pious man will be thought mad, the impious, wise; frenzied will be thought brave, the worst criminal a good man.

The soul and all the beliefs attached to it, according to which the soul is immortal by nature, or foresees that it can obtain immortality, as I have taught you — this will be laughed at and thought nonsense. And believe me, it will be considered a capital crime to give oneself to the religion of the mind. A new justice will be created and new laws. Nothing holy, nothing pious, nothing worthy of heaven and of the gods who dwell there, will be any more spoken of nor will find credence in the soul.

The gods will separate themselves from men, deplorable divorce. Only the evil angels will remain who will mingle with men, and constrain them by violence — miserable creatures — to all excesses of criminal audacity, engaging them in wars, brigandage, frauds, and in everything which contrary to the nature of the soul. Then the Earth will lose its equilibrium, the sea will be no longer navigable, the heaven will no longer be full of stars, the stars will stop their courses, and will be silent. The fruits of the Earth will molder, the soil will no longer be fertile, the air itself will grow thick with lugubrious torpor. Such will be the Old Age of the world: irreligion, disorder, confusion of all goods.Mortality Mechanics' Manual

When all these things have come to pass, O Asclepius, then the Lord and Father, the god first in power and *demiurge of the One God, having considered these customs and voluntary crimes, endeavoring, by his will, which is the divine will, to bar the way to vices and universal corruption and to correct errors, he will annihilate all malice, either by effacing it in a deluge or by consuming it by fire, or destroying it by pestilential maladies diffused in many places. Then he will bring back the world to its first beauty, so that this world may again be worthy of reverence and admiration, and that God also, creator and restorer of so great a work, may be glorified by the men who shall live then in continual hymns of praise and benedictions. That is what the rebirth of the world will be; a renewal of all good things, a holy and most solemn restoration of Nature Herself.”

———————-

*demiurge— noun: demiurge; plural noun: demiurges

 1. a being responsible for the creation of the universe, in particular.

  • (in Platonic philosophy) the Maker or Creator of the world.Support independent publishing: Buy this book on Lulu.
  • (in Gnosticism and other theological systems) a heavenly being, subordinate to the Supreme Being, that is considered to be the controller of the material world and antagonistic to all that is purely spiritual.

 ____________________________________________

Frances_YatesDame Frances Amelia Yates (28 November 1899 – 29 September 1981) was an English historian who focused on the study of the Renaissance. In an academic capacity, she taught at the Warburg Institute of the University of London for many years, and also wrote a number of seminal books on the subject of esoteric history.

In 1964 she published Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition, an examination of the thought of Giordano Bruno which came to be seen as her most significant publication. In this book, she emphasized the role of Hermeticism in Bruno’s thought, and this the role that magic and mysticism played in Renaissance thinking.  She wrote extensively on the occult or Neoplatonic philosophies of the Renaissance. Her books Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition (1964), The Art of Memory (1966), and The Rosicrucian Enlightenment (1972) are major works. — (Wikipedia.org)

64 BOOKS I HEARD LAST YEAR

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iphone4_v_screen02-640I stopped watching television.  I refuse to be “dumbed down” by the “vast wasteland” of insidious drivel produced by the “mind-control media”.  I prefer to spend my time with great writers.  Like most writers I read a lot of books.  In recent years I have become a huge fan of audio books! I listen to at least one book each week on my iPhone.

Recorded books are read to you, sometimes by the authors themselves, such as Stephen King or Neil Gaiman, while you do the routine hands-free activities of daily living: driving, grocery shopping, riding a bicycle, jogging, walking, cooking, cleaning, washing dishes, eating and pooping.

There are thousands of recorded books available.  You can start by downloading a FREE AUDIO BOOK from Audible.com.

This is a list of 64 Audio books I personally enjoyed hearing during the last year (many for the 2nd or 3rd time):

The Riverboat Series (5 books) by Philip Jose Farmer

Shantaram: A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Series of 6 books, including “And Another Thing”) by Douglas Adams

The Salmon of Doubt by Douglas Adams

The Long Lost Tea Time of The Soul by Douglas Adams

Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams

Ecco Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche

Heresy by S.J. Parris

Prophecy S.J. Parris

Sacrilege S.J. Parris

Touch by Clair North

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Clair North

Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine Harden

Wizard: The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla by Marc J. Seifer

My Inventions by Nikola Tesla

The Art of Happiness by Dalai Lama

Our Occulted History by Jim Marrs

Ubik by Phillip K. Dick

The Hair Potter Series (7 books) by J.K. Rowling

Hyperion by Dan Simmons

The Fall of Hyperion by Dan Simmons

The Domain Expeditionary Rescue Mission by Lawrence R. Spencer

Alien Interview by Matilda MacElroy

Kill Decision by Daniel Suarez

Daemon by Daniel Suarez

Influx by Daniel Suarez

Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan

Hollow World by Michael J. Sullivan

The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean

Pirates and the Man who brought them down by Colin Woodard

Far Journeys by Robert Monroe

Tao Te Ching by Stephen Mitchell

Off to Be The Wizard by Scott Meyer

Spell and High Water by Scott Meyer

Seize The Night by Dean Koontz

Fear Nothing by Dean Koontz

Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz

Bag of Bones by Stephen King

The John Carter Trilogy by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at The End of The Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Boo, by Neil Gaiman

Good Omens by Terry Pratchet and Neil Gaiman

Dune (Series of 7 books) by Frank Herbert

 

MARK TWAIN: THOUGHTS ABOUT DEATH

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MARK TWAIN on death

Death is the starlit strip between the companionship of yesterday and the reunion of tomorrow.
– on monument erected to Mark Twain & Ossip Gabrilowitsch

All say, “How hard it is that we have to die”– a strange complaint to come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

Whoever has lived long enough to find out what life is, knows how deep a debt of gratitude we owe to Adam, the first great benefactor of our race. He brought death into the world.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

The Impartial Friend: Death, the only immortal who treats us all alike, whose pity and whose peace and whose refuge are for all–the soiled and the pure, the rich and the poor, the loved and the unloved.
– Mark Twain, last written statement; Moments with Mark Twain, Paine

Pity is for the living, envy is for the dead.
Following the Equator

Death, the refuge, the solace, the best and kindliest and most prized friend and benefactor of the erring, the forsaken, the old and weary and broken of heart.
– Adam speech, 1883

Life was not a valuable gift, but death was. Life was a fever-dream made up of joys embittered by sorrows, pleasure poisoned by pain; a dream that was a nightmare-confusion of spasmodic and fleeting delights, ecstasies, exultations, happinesses, interspersed with long-drawn miseries, griefs, perils, horrors, disappointments, defeats,humiliations, and despairs–the heaviest curse devisable by divine ingenuity; but death was sweet, death was gentle, death was kind; death healed the bruised spirit and the broken heart, and gave them rest and forgetfulness; death was man’s best friend; when man could endure life no longer, death came and set him free.
Letters from the Earth

Manifestly, dying is nothing to a really great and brave man.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 7/1/1885 (referring to General Grant)

How lovely is death; and how niggardly it is doled out.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 8/19/1896

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man’s meat is inferior to pork.
More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927

[I am] not sorry for anybody who is granted the privilege of prying behind the curtain to see if there is any contrivance that is half so shabby and poor and foolish as the invention of mortal life.
– Letter to Mary Mason Fairbanks, 1894

I think we never become really and genuinely our entire and honest selves until we are dead–and not then until we have been dead years and years. People ought to start dead, and they would be honest so much earlier.
Mark Twain in Eruption

To die one’s self is a thing that must be easy, & light of consequence; but to lose a part of one’s self–well, we know how deep that pang goes, we who have suffered that disaster, received that wound which cannot heal.
– Letter to Will Bowen, 11/4/1888

Favored above Kings and Emperors is the stillborn child.
– Notebook, #42 1898

All people have had ill luck, but Jairus’s daughter & Lazarus the worst.
– Notebook #42, 1898

No real estate is permanently valuable but the grave.
– Notebook #42, 1898

Death is so kind, so benignant, to whom he loves; but he goes by us others & will not look our way.
– Letter to W. D. Howells, 12/20/1898

A distinguished man should be as particular about his last words as he is about his last breath. He should write them out on a slip of paper and take the judgment of his friends on them. He should never leave such a thing to the last hour of his life, and trust to an intellectual spurt at the last moment to enable him to say something smart with his latest gasp and launch into eternity with grandeur.
– “The Last Words of Great Men”, 1869

Death….a great Leveler — a king before whose tremendous majesty shades & differences in littleness cannot be discerned — an Alp from whose summit all small things are the same size.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 10/15/1871