Tag Archives: death

JEWEL and LOTUS

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JEWEL & LOTUS

Jewel within the Lotus
Phallus and the Womb,
United we are, both of us,
The Source of Life Anew.
We are really No-Things
Beings joined with Form:
Animating Matter
The Cause of all that grows.
All creation springs from Love,
Heaven joins the Earth:
We are Souls united with the Flesh,
Death is joined with Life.
I am like Air.
You are like Fire.
A hearth is made in Our embrace.
Our loins the fuel, our kiss the spark,
We fan the Flame with Our desire.
Rising smoke from each caress,
Our Love the heat, Our Joy reflects
That through Our Seed, Our Souls are met:
through Our Cause we are Effect.
One reaches,
One withdraws.
Positive flows to negative,
In and out and ebb and flow
Are rhythms of this Universe.
One is born;
One grows old.
Life and Death are a single thread –
Binding Souls within the flesh
We can escape this slavish strife:
Awake! Fly! Be Your Immortal Soul!
We can transcend the Game of Life –
Create A Universe of Your Own!

________________

— Lawrence R. Spencer —

A DEAD PERSON’S GUIDE TO LIVING

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This book is dedicated to all living beings who expect to die sometime and to all of the dead people who ever lived who may still be living somewhere, sometime, somehow. This book is also dedicated to all of the people who are living that may need some ideas about what to do with themselves after they die. Finally, this book is dedicated to all the people who will soon be living by virtue of one or more of the following circumstances: birth, rebirth, resurrection, reincarnation, transconfiguration, cryogenic resuscitation, invasion of alien beings, angels falling out of grace, an act of one or more gods, transformation or transmigration, arrival from a different time / space / universe / plane of existence, unimaginable others, Whoever you were, are, or will be, I trust that you will enjoy the “Rest of Eternity”.   — Lawrence R. Spencer

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THE LIGHT

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TOWARD THE LIGHT

“GO TOWARD THE LIGHT!

A lot of people (including a long list of living and dead celebrities) who were pronounced “medically dead” said that they had a “near death experience”.  Another common report is that they were immediately “drawn” toward a bright light. For a variety of reasons they decided, or where “told” by another disembodied spirit, to go back to the body. After they returned, the body “came back to life”, and they lived happily ever after – at least until they died again and did NOT come back again. At that time, one assumes they decided to go toward the light and that they did NOT come back, as far as we know.1001_cover

STAY AWAY FROM THE LIGHT!

Those people decided to stay away from the light and go back to their body. They lived long enough to tell someone about the experience. So, if you want to continue living with a body, this would be the most likely option for you. Otherwise, option #1 is still available, although not necessarily recommended.

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FOOTNOTE:

Peter Sellers was the comic genius of a generation of actors. He brought brilliant characterizations to numerous films, including “The Mouse That Roared” (1959), “Dr. Strangelove” (1964), “The Pink Panther” (1964), and “Being There” (1979). He was known for his enthusiastic way of totally absorbing himself in his characters, even carrying roles offstage. He also suffered from sad moods between films. While he knew his characters thoroughly, he said that he really did not know who he was. Then Peter Sellers, the brilliant, confused actor, had a near-death experience.

BEING THERESeated in a Hollywood mockup of a limousine’s back seat while shooting his last great film, “Being There“, he told Shirley MacLaine about his near-death experience, astonished that she did not consider him “bonkers.” Shirley documents their conversation in her book, Out on a Limb. In 1964, during the first of a rapid series of eight heart attacks, when his heart stopped and he was clinically dead, he had an out-of-body experience and saw the bright, loving light:

“Well, I felt myself leave my body. I just floated out of my physical form and I saw them cart my body away to the hospital. I went with it … I wasn’t frightened or anything like that because I was fine; and it was my body that was in trouble.”

The doctor saw that he was dead and massaged his heart vigorously, Meanwhile: “I looked around myself and I saw an incredibly beautiful bright loving white light above me. I wanted to go to that white light more than anything. I’ve never wanted anything more. I know there was love, real love, on the other side of the light which was attracting me so much. It was kind and loving and I remember thinking “That’s God.””

Peter’s out-of-body soul tried to elevate itself toward the light, but he fell short: “Then I saw a hand reach through the light. I tried to touch it, to grab onto it, to clasp it so it could sweep me up and pull me through it.” But just then his heart began beating again, and at that instant the hand’s voice said: “It’s not time. Go back and finish. It’s not time.” As the hand receded he felt himself floating back down to his body, waking up bitterly disappointed.

What effect did his near-death experience have on Sellers? His biographer says that “The act of “dying” became for Peter Sellers the most important experience of his life.” Sellers said of death: “I’ll never fear it again.” Family and friends found him more spiritual and reflective than before.”

— excerpted from the book 1001 THINGS TO DO WHILE YOU’RE DEAD: A DEAD PERSONS GUIDE TO LIVING

MARK TWAIN: THOUGHTS ABOUT DEATH

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MARK TWAIN on death

Death is the starlit strip between the companionship of yesterday and the reunion of tomorrow.
– on monument erected to Mark Twain & Ossip Gabrilowitsch

All say, “How hard it is that we have to die”– a strange complaint to come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

Whoever has lived long enough to find out what life is, knows how deep a debt of gratitude we owe to Adam, the first great benefactor of our race. He brought death into the world.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

The Impartial Friend: Death, the only immortal who treats us all alike, whose pity and whose peace and whose refuge are for all–the soiled and the pure, the rich and the poor, the loved and the unloved.
– Mark Twain, last written statement; Moments with Mark Twain, Paine

Pity is for the living, envy is for the dead.
Following the Equator

Death, the refuge, the solace, the best and kindliest and most prized friend and benefactor of the erring, the forsaken, the old and weary and broken of heart.
– Adam speech, 1883

Life was not a valuable gift, but death was. Life was a fever-dream made up of joys embittered by sorrows, pleasure poisoned by pain; a dream that was a nightmare-confusion of spasmodic and fleeting delights, ecstasies, exultations, happinesses, interspersed with long-drawn miseries, griefs, perils, horrors, disappointments, defeats,humiliations, and despairs–the heaviest curse devisable by divine ingenuity; but death was sweet, death was gentle, death was kind; death healed the bruised spirit and the broken heart, and gave them rest and forgetfulness; death was man’s best friend; when man could endure life no longer, death came and set him free.
Letters from the Earth

Manifestly, dying is nothing to a really great and brave man.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 7/1/1885 (referring to General Grant)

How lovely is death; and how niggardly it is doled out.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 8/19/1896

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man’s meat is inferior to pork.
More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927

[I am] not sorry for anybody who is granted the privilege of prying behind the curtain to see if there is any contrivance that is half so shabby and poor and foolish as the invention of mortal life.
– Letter to Mary Mason Fairbanks, 1894

I think we never become really and genuinely our entire and honest selves until we are dead–and not then until we have been dead years and years. People ought to start dead, and they would be honest so much earlier.
Mark Twain in Eruption

To die one’s self is a thing that must be easy, & light of consequence; but to lose a part of one’s self–well, we know how deep that pang goes, we who have suffered that disaster, received that wound which cannot heal.
– Letter to Will Bowen, 11/4/1888

Favored above Kings and Emperors is the stillborn child.
– Notebook, #42 1898

All people have had ill luck, but Jairus’s daughter & Lazarus the worst.
– Notebook #42, 1898

No real estate is permanently valuable but the grave.
– Notebook #42, 1898

Death is so kind, so benignant, to whom he loves; but he goes by us others & will not look our way.
– Letter to W. D. Howells, 12/20/1898

A distinguished man should be as particular about his last words as he is about his last breath. He should write them out on a slip of paper and take the judgment of his friends on them. He should never leave such a thing to the last hour of his life, and trust to an intellectual spurt at the last moment to enable him to say something smart with his latest gasp and launch into eternity with grandeur.
– “The Last Words of Great Men”, 1869

Death….a great Leveler — a king before whose tremendous majesty shades & differences in littleness cannot be discerned — an Alp from whose summit all small things are the same size.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 10/15/1871

RED RISING REVIEW

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red rising“The Red Rising Trilogy is an epic Macho Cinderella Story. The story and characters are eloquently sculpted from well-weathered egalitarian clichés of Star-Wars-Hunger-Game-Of-Thrones post-apocalyptic-peasant-revolts set in a high-tech ultra-hierarchal-Greco-Roman-space-opera-society.  Brilliant prose, plot twists and legions of antagonists are collectively dedicated to dystopian gore, guts and glory of gold-obsessed class-based blood feuds wherein the purposelessness of human life is to learn to love pain and power.

Predictably, The “Golden Couple” get married and live happily ever after, as most human fantasy stories aspire… getting married, having babies, living in a castle, served and lauded by the peasants is a “happy ending”.

The unwritten story, as usual, is that humans all die, inevitably, with nostalgic finality to seek their reward in “The Veil”.

This trilogy is perfect Hollywood film fodder for servants of money-motivated vested interests of the planetary power elite. The subservient classes: Red, Pinks, Browns etc., will spend their minimum wages in theaters by the shovel full to wallow in the “beautiful dramatic pain” of egalitarian dreams crushed in the subterranean mines of Mars.

Sadly, the genius of Pierce Brown as a masterful wordsmith and epic storyteller is wasted on repeating the same worn out “Hero Epic” story line recycled ad nausea since the days of Homer. Humans live in painful servitude until they die to be rewarded in the “afterlife”.  All in a blink of the eye for the soulless of “gods” who worship power and gold.

Where have all the Immortals gone?  Buried in the gory-damn dust of impossible dreams.

~ Lawrence R. Spencer ~