Tag Archives: soul

THE ICY FLAME

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Before Being was the Icy Flame.
You and I and All.
The Flame conceives.
And From that Eternal Fire comes Thought:
Joy and Love and Pain.
We pretend. We betray.
We deceive Our Selves with play.
We invade the dark relentless void with incandescent Light.
Like candles in a forge we play a game that melts the soul.
Each victory drowns the flame within Our Selves.
And yet The Flame still lingers in us all.
We flicker faintly far from The Hearth of Home.
Burn brightly Lonely spark.
Remember You and I and All:
We are the Icy Fire.

— Lawrence R. Spencer, 2012 —

Animism

Animism (from Latin anima, “breath, spirit, life”) is the observation that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence. Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism often includes “an idea of pervading life and will in nature”,  a belief that natural objects other than humans have souls.

The animistic perspective is so widely held and inherent to most indigenous peoples that they often do not even have a word in their languages that corresponds to “animism” or even “religion.

Animism encompasses the beliefs that all material phenomena have agency, that there exists no hard and fast distinction between the spiritual and physical (or material) world and that soul or spirit or sentience exists not only in humans, but also in other animals, plants, rocks, geographic features such as mountains or rivers or other entities of the natural environment: water sprites, vegetation deities, tree sprites, etc..

SHADOW HAIKU

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SHADOW HAIKU

A traditional Japanese haiku is a three-line poem with seventeen syllables, written in a 5/7/5 syllable count. Often focusing on images from nature, haiku emphasizes simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression.  Haiku began in thirteenth-century Japan.  In contrast to English verse typically characterized by meter, Japanese verse counts sound units known as “on” or morae. Traditional haiku consist of 17 on, in three phrases of five, seven and five on respectively.  Among contemporary poems teikei (定型 fixed form) haiku continue to use the 5-7-5 pattern while jiyuritsu (自由律 free form) haiku do not.

A Classic EXAMPLE:

An old pond!

A frog jumps in–

the sound of water.

 For more detailed information about Haiku, visit the website, 

HOW TO WRITE A HAIKU POEM:  http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Haiku-Poem