Tag Archives: haiku

SUN HAIKU

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SUN HAIKU

A Haiku (in the English language) is a short poem which uses imagistic language to convey the essence of an experience of nature or the season intuitively linked to the human condition. It is a development of the Japanese haiku poetic form in the English language.  Some of the more common practices in English include:  use of three lines of up to 17 syllables;  most commonly, 5, 7, 5.  Haiku uses an economy of words to paint a multi-tiered painting, without “telling all”.

POETRY THERAPY

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solstice_haiku

In the Western world, poetry is a dying art form…..  As art becomes extinct or ignored, so does the civilization.  Or, at the very least, the art being created, or the absence of it, reflect the spiritual condition of the individuals in the civilization.  Personally, I have discovered that writing poetry is very therapeutic. It creates  inner peace, perspective, serenity, spiritual insights, and aesthetic reverie.

Modern “poetry” is most often expressed in the Lyrics of songs.  Have you listened to very much “popular” music lately?  In the U.S. the most popular (best selling) music is “country music”.  The lyrics to the majority of these songs are written specifically to appeal to the LOWEST common denominators of human “intelligence”:  sex, cowboys, beer, trucks, parties, and the “idealized lifestyle” of the working-class peasant, jealousy, failed romance, and, did I mention sex?  Fundamentally, modern “music” is all about making money.  Like the rest of Western “civilization”, which is an artificially created mirage, bought and paid for by NWO bankers, legislated by criminal politicians, enforced by a psychotic military-police-state, and propagandized into “popularity” by the Global Media Machine — everything is about MONEY, Power, Control and Possessions…. and did I mention sex?

There is a quiet, simple remedy for the insane, manic, soulless absurdity created by the artificial environment of television, Hollywood films and the internet.  

It is a simple form of “meditation”:  Turn off the TV, turn off your cell-phone, turn ON Your Soul.  Write a poem.

If you wonder sometimes why you feel depressed, overwhelmed, stressed out, purposeless and alone, you may find Your SELF while writing a poem.  

I prefer HAIKU.  How about you?

I you would like to share your poems with me, and others who read the Blog, please post them in the COMMENTS!  🙂

FUTURE HAIKU

SHADOW HAIKU

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SHADOW HAIKU

A traditional Japanese haiku is a three-line poem with seventeen syllables, written in a 5/7/5 syllable count. Often focusing on images from nature, haiku emphasizes simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression.  Haiku began in thirteenth-century Japan.  In contrast to English verse typically characterized by meter, Japanese verse counts sound units known as “on” or morae. Traditional haiku consist of 17 on, in three phrases of five, seven and five on respectively.  Among contemporary poems teikei (定型 fixed form) haiku continue to use the 5-7-5 pattern while jiyuritsu (自由律 free form) haiku do not.

A Classic EXAMPLE:

An old pond!

A frog jumps in–

the sound of water.

 For more detailed information about Haiku, visit the website, 

HOW TO WRITE A HAIKU POEM:  http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Haiku-Poem

SERENE HAIKU

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SERENE HAIKU

haiku, unrhymed Japanese poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively. The term haiku is derived from the first element of the word haikai (a humorous form of renga, or linked-verse poem) and the second element of the word hokku (the initial stanza of a renga). The hokku, which set the tone of a renga, had to mention in its three lines such subjects as the season, time of day, and the dominant features of the landscape, making it almost an independent poem. The hokku (often interchangeably called haikai) became known as the haiku late in the 19th century, when it was entirely divested of its original function of opening a sequence of verse; today even the earlier hokku are usually called haiku.

Originally, the haiku form was restricted in subject matter to an objective description of nature suggestive of one of the seasons, evoking a definite, though unstated, emotional response. The form gained distinction in the 17th century, during the Tokugawa period, when the great master Bashō elevated the hokku, as it was then known, to a highly refined and conscious art. Haiku has since remained the most popular form in Japanese poetry.