Category Archives: PICTURE POEMS

Picture Poems a poems written for, and pasted on, pictures, paintings or graphic art. The poem describes or emulated the picture in verse.

AFFLICTIONS

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

WALLS OF SPIRIT“604 BCE —

Laozi, a philosopher who wrote a small book called “The Way”, [i] (Footnote) was an IS-BE of great wisdom, who overcame the effects of the “Old Empire” amnesia / hypnosis machinery and escaped from Earth. His understanding of the nature of an IS-BE must have been very good to accomplish this.

According to the common legend, his last lifetime as a human was lived in a small village in China. He contemplated the essence of his own life. Like Guatama Siddhartha, he confronted his own thoughts, and past lives. In so doing, he recovered some of his own memory, ability and immortality.

As an old man, he decided to leave the village and go to the forest to depart the body. The village gatekeeper stopped him and begged him to write down his personal philosophy before leaving. Here is a small piece of advice he gave about “the way” he rediscovered his own spirit:

“He who looks will not see it;

He who listens will not hear it;

He who gropes will not grasp it.

The formless nonentity, the motionless source of motion.

The infinite essence of the spirit is the source of life.

Spirit is self.

Walls form and support a room,

yet the space between them is most important.

A pot is formed of clay,

yet the space formed therein is most useful.

Action is caused by the force of nothing on something,

just as the nothing of spirit is the source of all form.

One suffers great afflictions because one has a body.

Without a body what afflictions could one suffer?

When one cares more for the body than for his own spirit,

One becomes the body and looses the way of the spirit.

The self, the spirit, creates illusion.

The delusion of Man is that reality is not an illusion.

One who creates illusions and makes them more real than reality, follows the path of the spirit and finds the way of heaven”.

______________

Excerpt from the book ALIEN INTERVIEW

[i] “Laozi, a philosopher who wrote a small book called “The Way”…”

“According to tradition, it was written around 6th century BC by the Taoist sage Laozi (or Lao Tzu, “Old Master”), a record-keeper at the Zhou Dynasty court, by whose name the text is known in China. Tao Te Ching is a Chinese classic text. Its name comes from the opening words of its two sections: dào “way,” and dé “virtue“.

 ALIEN INTERVIEW, edited by Lawrence R. SpencerThis ancient book is also central in Chinese religion, not only for Taoism (Dàojiāo 道教) but Chinese Buddhism, which when first introduced into China was largely interpreted through the use of Taoist words and concepts. Many Chinese artists, including poets, painters, calligraphers, and even gardeners have used the Tao Te Ching as a source of inspiration. Its influence has also spread widely outside East Asia, aided by hundreds of translations into Western languages.”

 Tao is nameless. (Tao) goes beyond distinctions, and transcends language.

Laozi describes a state of existence before time or space:

 “The Way that can be told of is not an unvarying way;

The names that can be named are not unvarying names.

It was from the Nameless that heaven and Earth sprang;

The named is but the mother that rears the ten thousand creatures.

Each after its kind.”

 “The Spirit never dies.

It is the Mysterious Female.

The doorway of the Mysterious Female

Is the base from which Heaven and Earth sprang.

It is there within us, all the while;

Draw upon it as you will.

It never runs dry.

 We put spokes together and call it a wheel;

But it is on the space where there is nothing that the value of the wheel depends.

We turn clay to make a vessel;

But it is on the space where there is nothing that the value of the vessel depends.

We pierce doors and windows to make a house;

And it is on these spaces where there is nothing that the value of the house depends.

Therefore just as we take advantage of what is,

we should recognize the value of what is not.

 Knowing others is wisdom;

Knowing the self is enlightenment.

Mastering others requires force;

Mastering the self requires strength;

He who knows he has enough is rich.

Perseverance is a sign of will power.

He who stays where he is, endures.

To die but not to perish is to be eternally present.”

Many believe the Tao Te Ching contains universal truths that have been independently recognized in other philosophies, both religious and secular.”

— Reference: Wikipedia.org

MARK TWAIN: THOUGHTS ABOUT DEATH

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

MARK TWAIN on death

Death is the starlit strip between the companionship of yesterday and the reunion of tomorrow.
– on monument erected to Mark Twain & Ossip Gabrilowitsch

All say, “How hard it is that we have to die”– a strange complaint to come from the mouths of people who have had to live.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

Whoever has lived long enough to find out what life is, knows how deep a debt of gratitude we owe to Adam, the first great benefactor of our race. He brought death into the world.
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson and the Comedy of the Extraordinary Twins

The Impartial Friend: Death, the only immortal who treats us all alike, whose pity and whose peace and whose refuge are for all–the soiled and the pure, the rich and the poor, the loved and the unloved.
– Mark Twain, last written statement; Moments with Mark Twain, Paine

Pity is for the living, envy is for the dead.
Following the Equator

Death, the refuge, the solace, the best and kindliest and most prized friend and benefactor of the erring, the forsaken, the old and weary and broken of heart.
– Adam speech, 1883

Life was not a valuable gift, but death was. Life was a fever-dream made up of joys embittered by sorrows, pleasure poisoned by pain; a dream that was a nightmare-confusion of spasmodic and fleeting delights, ecstasies, exultations, happinesses, interspersed with long-drawn miseries, griefs, perils, horrors, disappointments, defeats,humiliations, and despairs–the heaviest curse devisable by divine ingenuity; but death was sweet, death was gentle, death was kind; death healed the bruised spirit and the broken heart, and gave them rest and forgetfulness; death was man’s best friend; when man could endure life no longer, death came and set him free.
Letters from the Earth

Manifestly, dying is nothing to a really great and brave man.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 7/1/1885 (referring to General Grant)

How lovely is death; and how niggardly it is doled out.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 8/19/1896

It is a solemn thought: dead, the noblest man’s meat is inferior to pork.
More Maxims of Mark, Johnson, 1927

[I am] not sorry for anybody who is granted the privilege of prying behind the curtain to see if there is any contrivance that is half so shabby and poor and foolish as the invention of mortal life.
– Letter to Mary Mason Fairbanks, 1894

I think we never become really and genuinely our entire and honest selves until we are dead–and not then until we have been dead years and years. People ought to start dead, and they would be honest so much earlier.
Mark Twain in Eruption

To die one’s self is a thing that must be easy, & light of consequence; but to lose a part of one’s self–well, we know how deep that pang goes, we who have suffered that disaster, received that wound which cannot heal.
– Letter to Will Bowen, 11/4/1888

Favored above Kings and Emperors is the stillborn child.
– Notebook, #42 1898

All people have had ill luck, but Jairus’s daughter & Lazarus the worst.
– Notebook #42, 1898

No real estate is permanently valuable but the grave.
– Notebook #42, 1898

Death is so kind, so benignant, to whom he loves; but he goes by us others & will not look our way.
– Letter to W. D. Howells, 12/20/1898

A distinguished man should be as particular about his last words as he is about his last breath. He should write them out on a slip of paper and take the judgment of his friends on them. He should never leave such a thing to the last hour of his life, and trust to an intellectual spurt at the last moment to enable him to say something smart with his latest gasp and launch into eternity with grandeur.
– “The Last Words of Great Men”, 1869

Death….a great Leveler — a king before whose tremendous majesty shades & differences in littleness cannot be discerned — an Alp from whose summit all small things are the same size.
– Letter to Olivia Clemens, 10/15/1871

COMPASSION HURTS

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

compassion“Compassion hurts.
When you feel connected to everything, you also feel responsible for everything. And you cannot turn away. Your destiny is bound with the destinies of others.

You must either learn to carry the universe or be crushed by it. You must grow strong enough to love the world, yet empty enough to sit down at the same table with its worst horrors.”

— Andrew Boyd —
Daily Afflictions: The agony of being connected to everything in the universe.

READ THE BOOK: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0393322815/qid=1006662488/ref=sr_11_0_1/104-0097384-0675166

VISIT THE WEBSITE:     http://www.dailyafflictions.com/visitvoid.html