Category Archives: 1001 THINGS TO DO WHILE YOU’RE DEAD

FREE YOURSELF TO BE YOURSELF

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1001_Things_To_Do_While_You’re_Dead — An INTERVIEW with Lawrence R. Spencer

BE YOURSELF FOR A CHANGE.

“Relax. As a disembodied spirit you don’t have to hang around with people any more so you don’t have to try to impress anyone. In human society you are usually expected to look good, smell good, be good, do good and exhibit other behavior that may not come naturally to you.

For example, if you don’t take a bath for a few weeks your body will stink like a bag of rotten meat – which is essentially what it is. As a spirit you don’t have to shower, shave, brush your teeth, eat, go to work, pee or perform any of those nasty habits.

The 19th century German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer (1788 – 1860) said, “We forfeit three-fourths of ourselves in order to be like other people.”

So, forget all that stuff you were taught about “now I’m supposed to…”. Do what pleases you.”

_____________________

Excerpt from 1,001 Things To Do While You’re Dead: A Dead Persons’ Guide To Living, by Lawrence R. Spencer

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YOUR VOICE ALONE

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VoiceSamuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in Paris for most of his adult life and wrote in both English and French. He is widely regarded as among the most influential writers of the 20th century.

Beckett’s work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human existence, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour, and became increasingly minimalist in his later career. He is considered one of the last modernist writers, and one of the key figures in what Martin Esslin called the “Theatre of the Absurd”.   Beckett was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Literature.

SEDLEC OSSUARY

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Only Catholics would build a chapel out of the bones of 70,000 people who died from The Plague!  It’s so perverted, it’s almost aesthetic!

Sedlec Ossuary

The Sedlec Ossuary is a small Roman Catholic chapel, located beneath the Cemetery Church of All Saints in Sedlec, a suburb of Kutná Hora in the Czech Republic. The ossuary is estimated to contain the skeletons of between 40,000 and 70,000 people, whose bones have in many cases been artistically arranged to form decorations and furnishings for the chapel. The ossuary is among the most visited tourist attractions of the Czech Republic, attracting over 200,000 visitors yearly. Four enormous bell-shaped mounds occupy the corners of the chapel. An enormous chandelier of bones, which contains at least one of every bone in the human body, hangs from the center of the nave with garlands of skulls draping the vault. Other works include piers and monstrances flanking the altar, a large Schwarzenberg coat of arms, and the signature of Rint, also executed in bone, on the wall near the entrance.  SEE A COMPLETE PHOTO GALLERY HERE:  Sedlec Ossuary Gallery

THOUGHTS ABOUT DEATH BY DEAD PEOPLE BEFORE THEY DIED

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FROM THE PREFACES TO THE BOOK   1001 THINGS TO DO WHILE YOU’RE DEAD: A DEAD PERSON’S GUIDE TO LIVING —

“I wonder if I could have been here before? As I drive up the Roman road the theater seems familiar. Perhaps I headed a legion up that same white road… I passed a chateau in ruins which I possibly helped escalade in the Middle Ages. There is no proof nor yet any denial.  We were, We are, and We will be.”

— General George S. Patton

“Eternity is not something that begins after you’re dead. It is going on all the time. We are in it now.”

— Charlotte Perkins Gilman

“After your death you will be what you were before your birth.”

— Arthur Schopenhauer

“I look upon death to be as necessary to our constitution as sleep. We shall rise refreshed in the morning.”

— Benjamin Franklin

“That is not dead which can eternal lie, And with strange eons even Death may die.”

— H.P. Lovecraft

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