Category Archives: THE OZ FACTORS

“The Oz Factors” is a book which reveals the 12 common denominators of civilization that prevent mankind for discovering workable solutions to the problems of life. The Oz Factors was written by Lawrence R. Spencer and published in 1999.

UNIVERSE WITHIN

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YOU ARE THE POWER               “You’ve always had the power to go back to Kansas” — Glinda

                “Oh Dear! That’s too wonderful to be true!” — Dorothy

                “Now those magic slippers will take you home in two seconds. Just close your eyes and think to yourself, ‘There’s no place like home’.” — Glinda

                “Then why didn’t you tell her before”? — The Scarecrow

                “Because she wouldn’t have believed me.  She had to learn it for herself.”– Glinda

                “If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t look any further than my own back yard, because if it isn’t there, I never really lost it to begin with.” — Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz”

Like Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ we are creatures of our own design. We live in universes created by our own agreements and imagination. We are inside the Physical Universe looking out to find the origin of our being. We long for a place we feel certain must exist; a place where there is no trouble. We wait for wizards and witches to show us the way home. Yet we fear to close our eyes and click our heels to see the Universe Within.

Our journey home begins at the source of the rainbow; shining light upon our own eternal, ethereal selves.”

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— Excerpt from THE OZ FACTORS, by Lawrence R. Spencer

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AUDIO BOOK:  http://www.audible.com/pd/ref=sr_1_1?asin=B00B25HTUQ&qid=1358802443&sr=1-1

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE OVER THE RAINBOW & QUANTUM LEAP

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 To go Down The Rabbit Hole is to enter a period of chaos or confusion.  The expression is an allusion to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, published in 1865.

Over the rainbow” is a state of total, irrevocable madness or delusion.  The phrase is from the film “The Wizard of Oz“, in which Dorothy is transported into another world entirely unconnected from her reality.  The film is based on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,an American children’s novel written by author L. Frank Baum in 1900.

A “Quantum Leap” is when you find yourself in the middle of a situation where you have no idea what is going on, but everyone else around you assumes you do.

The term “quantum leap” is a reference to the TV show of the same name where the lead character is trapped in time and travels therein by leaping into the body of someone in the past, but having no idea who he is or why he is there. In order to leave the body, the lead character must figure out what “situation/conflict” must be resolved or wrong must be righted by the host body. The people around him assume he is the person whose body he occupies, so anything he does, the people around him think it is the host body doing it.

Definitions from www.urbandictionary.com

EVERYTHING LOGIC

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A–“WHICH IS THE WAY BACK TO KANSAS?”

“I’d give anything to get out of Oz altogether, but which is the way back to Kansas? I can’t go the way I came.”–Dorothy

“The only person who might know would be the great and wonderful Wizard of Oz himself. He lives in the Emerald City and that’s a long journey from here. Did you bring your broomstick with you?”–Glinda, the Good Witch of the North

“No, I’m afraid I didn’t.”–Dorothy

“Well then, you’ll have to walk. It’s always best to start at the beginning and all you do is follow the Yellow Brick Road.”–Glinda in ‘The Wizard of Oz’

One of the primordial questions Dorothy was trying to answer in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ was, “which is the way back to Kansas?”

Trying to figure out the answers to the mysteries of life here on planet Earth is even harder than Dorothy trying to get back to Kansas–none of us have a broomstick to ride, we don’t have a good witch to ask for directions and there is no Yellow Brick Road to follow.  So, we’re stuck here having to figure it out for ourselves, logically, using the information we have in our environment.

To begin at the beginning, the Land of Oz is a type of Universe. According to Webster’s Dictionary, a universe is defined as: “an area, province or sphere, as of thought or activity, regarded as a distinct, comprehensive system or world.”

The physical reality we all share on Earth and everything throughout the surrounding space is called the Physical Universe (PU).

On the other side of reality is your own imagination, your personal perceptions, viewpoints, dreams, hopes, desires, and creations, which comprise Your Own Universe (YOU).

The Land of Oz can be considered to be a Universe dreamed up by Dorothy, as conceived in the mind of L Frank Baum, the author of the book. (It has been speculated that the author created the “Land of Oz” after glancing at his file cabinet. The two file drawers were labeled “A-N” and “O-Z”. Dorothy could just as easily have been transported by the author’s pen into the imaginary “Land of AN”.)

In the movie version of the story, Dorothy creates the Land of  Oz in a dream, induced by a knock on the head, using remnants of Kansas in the physical universe mixed together with creations from her own universe–which, for Dorothy, existed over the rainbow in the Land of Oz.

Every Universe seems to be made up of its own, peculiar set of Laws. The PHYSICAL UNIVERSE, for example, is built on a set of agreed upon Laws.  A few examples of these Laws are:

The Law of Motion: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

The Food Chain Law: “In order for one life organism to live, another life organism must die.”

The Law of Gravity: “Whatever goes up, must come down.”

The Law of Time: “Time marches on.”

Most of us take the Laws of the Physical Universe for granted because everyone seems to agree with them. However, such laws leave a lot to be desired when compared to the Laws of a Universe we might create for ourselves!

In YOUR OWN UNIVERSE you can create any set of Laws, or have no Laws at all. You can make them, change them or break them. The Laws of YOUR OWN UNIVERSE can be anything or nothing, limited only by your imagination.

In YOUR OWN UNIVERSE, everything you wish comes true, because you are the “wizard” of YOUR OWN UNIVERSE!

In Dorothy’s universe, Scarecrows and trees can talk; witches can be beautiful and fly in magic bubbles; Munchkin girls join the “Lullaby League” and Munchkin boys have a “Lollipop Guild”; horses can change their color; and, Dorothy can dye her eyes to match her gown.

Dorothy’s first awareness of the particular universe she calls the Land of Oz is the realization that she is definitely NOT in Kansas. When she opens the door to her farmhouse, which has just crash-landed in Oz, Dorothy compares her past experience in Kansas with her present experience in Munchkinland. The Technicolor flowers, a good witch in a flying bubble, all the little brightly dressed people, a yellow brick road, etc, are definitely NOT similar to anything she has ever seen in Kansas.

The Land of Oz is an example of what Earth scientists would call an anomaly. For Dorothy, the anomaly is a departure from the usual arrangement of things as compared to her past experiences. In the universe of Oz, everything is so completely different from the universe Dorothy is familiar with in Kansas that she thinks she is lost.

How do you find the way back home when you are lost?

One way is to ask someone for directions. Of course, if you’ve ever been sent on a wild goose chase by a stranger, the experience taught you that it is a good idea to be somewhat selective as to whom you ask for directions. So, how do you know who is a reliable source of directions or information?

Perhaps it would be a good idea to find out something about the person from whom you are asking directions before you act upon what they tell you. Right? (Or, is it left?)

In our example, should Dorothy be asking for directions back to Kansas from the local natives, the Munchkins?

The main reason one would ask a local resident for directions is that one makes the assumption, otherwise known as an hypothesis (which is the first step in creating any scientific theory), that someone who lives in the area will be a reliable source of information and will give correct directions.

Well, in Dorothy’s case, the Munchkins have lots of familiarity with the Land of Oz, but they have no familiarity with Kansas. Fortunately for Dorothy, they are honest enough to tell her that they don’t have a clue where Kansas is, and they pass the buck to the Wizard of Oz, who they believe knows everything. And, based on their familiarity with the Yellow Brick Road and Munchkinland, they are certain that it leads to where the Great Oz lives.

Most would agree that a certainty is better than an assumption. When one has no familiarity based on personal experience or observation, it is best not to assume that one knows the correct directions. So, one asks for information from someone one believe knows–like a scientist, for example–who is supposed to be familiar with the area or subject in question.

Do the local Munchkins or local scientists of Oz give Dorothy the correct directions to help her get back to Kansas?

When Dorothy crash-landed her house in Munchkin City, the Munchkins cowered under the bushes and flowers in terror of retribution for the death of the Wicked Witch of the East from her mean, nasty, ugly sister, the Wicked Witch of the West.

Their benevolent, all-powerful protector, Glinda, the Good Witch of the North, who the Munchkins trust implicitly, is not much help in solving Dorothy’s problem, either. To begin with, Glinda does not have all the information regarding the situation, because she was not even there when Dorothy crashed her house into Munchkin City and inadvertently killed a wicked witch.

Undaunted by her lack of factual information, the first thing Glinda does after coaxing the Munchkins out from their hiding places, is to sing them a song about her assumption, or hypothesis, regarding Dorothy’s crash-landing. She sings: “Come out, come out, wherever you are, and meet the young lady who fell from a star. She fell from the sky, she fell very far, and ‘Kansas’ she says, is the name of the star.”

So, where did Glinda get the idea that Dorothy came from a star? Dorothy never said that she came from a star! But, somehow this all seems very logical to the Munchkins. Even Dorothy doesn’t object to Glinda’s false statement!

In our analogy, Glinda’s assumption that Dorothy fell from a star could be called a scientific theory. The theory proposed by the Good Witch of the North is that Kansas is a star! This theory is based on an assumption derived from an apparent anomaly as measured against her own personal experience and by information received from the Munchkins who are supposed to be a reliable source, but, who did not actually see the house crash because they were all in hiding. In truth, none of them have any familiarity with Kansas or cyclones or farm houses or dogs or little girls, either!

To complicate matters further, Glinda has to put on the appearance that she knows what she’s talking about in front of all her Munchkins followers, even though she is really just making a wild guess. After all, she has a very good job being the protector of the Munchkins, who appear to be utterly defenseless against their enemies, the Wicked Witch sisters. Anyway, Glinda is a good witch, which means she is probably really trying to help, so, they all believe her scientific theory that Dorothy has fallen from a star.

In their cute little minds, the Munchkins have accepted, without question, the logic, which underlies the assumption that is the basis of Glinda’s scientific theory:

SKY equals VERY FAR equals STAR equals KANSAS.

This kind of reasoning process could be called “Everything Logic”; i.e., Everything Equals Everything. This sort of logic might also be the definition of stupidity.

Example: If KANSAS equaled SKY equaled STAR, one could theoretically gaze up into the heavenly firmament to watch Kansas cattle grazing on the twinkling prairies in the stars above.

Unfortunately, much of what we call “science” on planet Earth is based on “Everything Logic”.”

— Excerpted from THE OZ FACTORS, by Lawrence R. Spencer

 

64 BOOKS I HEARD LAST YEAR

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iphone4_v_screen02-640I stopped watching television.  I refuse to be “dumbed down” by the “vast wasteland” of insidious drivel produced by the “mind-control media”.  I prefer to spend my time with great writers.  Like most writers I read a lot of books.  In recent years I have become a huge fan of audio books! I listen to at least one book each week on my iPhone.

Recorded books are read to you, sometimes by the authors themselves, such as Stephen King or Neil Gaiman, while you do the routine hands-free activities of daily living: driving, grocery shopping, riding a bicycle, jogging, walking, cooking, cleaning, washing dishes, eating and pooping.

There are thousands of recorded books available.  You can start by downloading a FREE AUDIO BOOK from Audible.com.

This is a list of 64 Audio books I personally enjoyed hearing during the last year (many for the 2nd or 3rd time):

The Riverboat Series (5 books) by Philip Jose Farmer

Shantaram: A Novel by Gregory David Roberts

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Series of 6 books, including “And Another Thing”) by Douglas Adams

The Salmon of Doubt by Douglas Adams

The Long Lost Tea Time of The Soul by Douglas Adams

Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency by Douglas Adams

Ecco Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche

Heresy by S.J. Parris

Prophecy S.J. Parris

Sacrilege S.J. Parris

Touch by Clair North

The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Clair North

Escape from Camp 14 by Blaine Harden

Wizard: The Life and Times of Nikola Tesla by Marc J. Seifer

My Inventions by Nikola Tesla

The Art of Happiness by Dalai Lama

Our Occulted History by Jim Marrs

Ubik by Phillip K. Dick

The Hair Potter Series (7 books) by J.K. Rowling

Hyperion by Dan Simmons

The Fall of Hyperion by Dan Simmons

The Domain Expeditionary Rescue Mission by Lawrence R. Spencer

Alien Interview by Matilda MacElroy

Kill Decision by Daniel Suarez

Daemon by Daniel Suarez

Influx by Daniel Suarez

Theft of Swords by Michael J. Sullivan

Hollow World by Michael J. Sullivan

The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean

Pirates and the Man who brought them down by Colin Woodard

Far Journeys by Robert Monroe

Tao Te Ching by Stephen Mitchell

Off to Be The Wizard by Scott Meyer

Spell and High Water by Scott Meyer

Seize The Night by Dean Koontz

Fear Nothing by Dean Koontz

Ashley Bell by Dean Koontz

Bag of Bones by Stephen King

The John Carter Trilogy by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at The End of The Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Boo, by Neil Gaiman

Good Omens by Terry Pratchet and Neil Gaiman

Dune (Series of 7 books) by Frank Herbert