Tag Archives: fantasy

FANTASY REALITY

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FANTASY REALITY

A Gentle Maiden I do See!
She does not turn to look at Me.
An Enchanting Spirit floats nearby…
She follows with Her Loving Eyes.
All My Kingdom I would trade
For a Single Glance, a Longing Gaze
from this Perfect, Precious Maid!
How can I be a Butterfly?
My Angel, I am Floating Near!
There is nothing You should fear.
Come, and Fly Away with Me!
Yet this cannot be Reality….
Alas, My Dreams are Fantasies.

_______

Lawrence R. Spencer. 2013.

YOU’VE ALWAYS HAD THE POWER

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“You’ve always had the power to go back to Kansas”–Glinda

                “Oh Dear! That’s too wonderful to be true!”–Dorothy

                “Now those magic slippers will take you home in two seconds. Just close your eyes and think to yourself, ‘There’s no place like home’.”–Glinda

                “Then why didn’t you tell her before”?–The Scarecrow

                “Because she wouldn’t have believed me. She had to learn it for herself.”–Glinda

                “If I ever go looking for my heart’s desire again, I won’t look any further than my own back yard, because if it isn’t there, I never really lost it to begin with.”–Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz”

                Like Dorothy in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ we are creatures of our own design. We live in universes created by our own agreements and imagination. We are inside the Physical Universe looking out to find the origin of our being. We long for a place we feel certain must exist; a place where there is no trouble. We wait for wizards and witches to show us the way home. Yet we fear to close our eyes and click our heels to see the Universe Within.

               Our journey home begins at the source of the rainbow; shining light upon our own eternal, ethereal selves.

               The history of mankind seems blanketed in a simultaneous state of amnesia and deja vu. The ruins of ancient civilizations whisper a reminder that we have forgotten everything we knew.

A multitude of gods have shown themselves like shadows in the halls of history. We know not yet, except by our own observation and decision, which of them is real. We are betrayed by those who teach us that we must trust the Wizards of the West. While pretentious politicians defend the castles of the Witch, the media monkeys swarm to spin perverted lies to cover up their covert tricks.

The voiceless bones of wonderful wizards have dissolved to mortal dust once more. Their words have vanished in the smoke of sacred libraries, searing our souls with the stupefying stench of wisdom lost forever in their flames. From day to day the timeworn treadmill of survival forces us to worship at the soulless bankers’ shrine. Gold is still the god of the great and powerful Oz.

We have crash-landed in a twisted alien landscape of pain and mortality, far away from our home Universe. As a race we have amnesia. We are repeatedly bumped on the head by the recurring cataclysmic upheavals of a planet whirling in space like a farmhouse in a tornado.

               The future is an extension of the present. We must live our lives in the present in a manner which will create the greatest good for the greatest number of beings in the future. If we are aware of our own past lives, we must also be aware that we are creating our own future by our present actions. We will inherit our own legacy.

               As Professor Marvel points out with simple eloquence, “There are no other wizards…”

               We are apparently the only wizards there ever were and the only wizards that ever will be. We are each a part of a time track of the past, present and future of our own creation, individually and collectively.              

               If we let the Wicked Witches run the culture now, they will be in charge of the place when we come back. Just as we are the descendants of past generations, you and I may very well become, through reincarnation, the children of our children–we are the future generations who will inherit the environmental and cultural conditions of the future which we ourselves are creating today.

               Man has apparently been searching the stars for a way to leave the Earth and go “over the rainbow” to a place where there is no trouble.

               Since before the beginning of our own dim primordial prehistory, we have been looking into the depths of our own immortal selves for a way “over the rainbow” back to YOUR OWN UNIVERSE–our own identity, simplicity and power as spiritual beings. This has been the dream of many religious philosophers throughout the ages.

               We still have not solved many of the mysteries of the physical universe. However, we can CHOOSE to see what’s in it. We can CHOOSE to disagree with what we see. We can CHOOSE to agree to the creation of a new and better universe.

               Dorothy and her friends have taught us a valuable allegorical lesson: Dorothy got herself into the Land of Oz, and she got herself back to Kansas, but she would not have made it without the help of her friends. If ever there will be a Yellow Brick Road, if ever there will be an Emerald City of which we can be proud, we must build it ourselves. “

— Excerpt from THE OZ FACTORS, written by Lawrence R. Spencer

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STEAM PUNK FAERIE

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STEAMPUNK

Steampunk is a genre which came into prominence during the 1980s and early 1990s and incorporates elements of science fiction, fantasy, alternate history, horror, and speculative fiction. It involves a setting where steam power is widely used—whether in an alternate history such as Victorian era Britain or “Wild West”-era United States, or in a post-apocalyptic time —that incorporates elements of either science fiction or fantasy. Works of steampunk often feature anachronistic technology, or futuristic innovations as Victorians might have envisioned them, based on a Victorian perspective on fashion, culture, architectural style, and art. This technology includes such fictional machines as those found in the works of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, or the contemporary authors Philip Pullman, Scott Westerfeld and China Mieville.

Other examples of steampunk contain alternative history-style presentations of such technology as lighter-than-air airships, analog computers, or such digital mechanical computers as Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace’sAnalytical Engine.

Steampunk also refers to art, fashion, and design that are informed by the aesthetics of Steampunk literature. Various modern utilitarian objects have been modded by individual artisans into a pseudo-Victorian mechanical “steampunk” style, and a number of visual and musical artists have been described as steampunk.  Steampunk is most directly influenced by, and often adopts the style of, the 19th century scientific romances of Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley.

FAERIE

The word fairy derives from Middle English faierie (also fayeryefeiriefairie), a direct borrowing from Old French faerie (Modern French féerie) meaning the land, realm, or characteristic activity (i.e. enchantment) of the legendary people of folklore and romance called (in Old French) faie or fee (Modern French fée). This derived ultimately from Late Latin fata (one of the personified Fates, hence a guardian or tutelary spirit, hence a spirit in general); cf. Italian fata, Portuguese fada, Spanish hada of the same origin.

Fata, although it became a feminine noun in the Romance languages, was originally the neuter plural (“the Fates”) of fatum, past participle of the verb fari to speak, hence “thing spoken, decision, decree” or “prophetic declaration, prediction”, hence “destiny, fate”. It was used as the equivalent of the Greek Μοῖραι Moirai, the personified Fates who determined the course and ending of human life.

To the word faie was added the suffix -erie (Modern English -(e)ry), used to express either a place where something is found (fishery, heronry, nunnery) or a trade or typical activity engaged in by a person (cookery, midwifery, thievery). In later usage it generally applied to any kind of quality or activity associated with a particular sort of person, as in English knavery, roguery, witchery, wizardry.

Faie became Modern English fay “a fairy”; the word is, however, rarely used, although it is well known as part of the name of the legendary sorceress Morgan le Fay of Arthurian legend. Faierie became fairy, but with that spelling now almost exclusively referring to one of the legendary people, with the same meaning as fay. In the sense “land where fairies dwell”, the distinctive and archaic spellings Faery and Faerie are often used. Faery is also used in the sense of “a fairy”, and the back-formation fae, as an equivalent or substitute for fay is now sometimes seen.

The word fey, originally meaning “fated to die” or “having forebodings of death” (hence “visionary”, “mad”, and various other derived meanings) is completely unrelated, being from Old English fæge, Proto-Germanic *faigja- and Proto-Indo-European *poikyo-, whereas Latin fata comes from the Indo-European root *bhã- “speak”. Due to the identical pronunciation of the two words, “fay” is sometimes misspelled “fey”.

Fairies are generally described as human in appearance and having magical powers. Their origins are less clear in the folklore, being variously dead, or some form of demon, or a species completely independent of humans or angels.[3] Folklorists have suggested that their actual origin lies in a conquered race living in hiding,[4] or in religious beliefs that lost currency with the advent of Christianity. These explanations are not necessarily incompatible, and they may be traceable to multiple sources.

Much of the folklore about fairies revolves around protection from their malice, by such means as cold iron (iron is like poison to fairies, and they will not go near it) or charms of rowan and herbs, or avoiding offense by shunning locations known to be theirs.[6] In particular, folklore describes how to prevent the fairies from stealing babies and substituting changelings, and abducting older people as well. Many folktales are told of fairies, and they appear as characters in stories from medieval tales of chivalry, to Victorian fairy tales, and up to the present day in modern literature.  ( Reference:  Wikipedia.org)