Tag Archives: time travel

TIME TRAVELING AROUND THE ROMAN EMPIRE

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

For ancient history geeks, like me, this video demostrates how to use the “Orbis” mapping system, from Stanford University, is the coolest history study tool invented for want-to-be time travelers.  Here’s the link to the website: http://orbis.stanford.edu/

“Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents.

Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.

For the first time, ORBIS allows us to express Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity.

Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.

NEVER WHEN THEN

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

“Space is a distance between objects. Time is a measure of the duration of motion of objects in space. Space and Motion are always “now” – never when or then. Therefore, “time travel” can only be memory of “when”, or a hypothetical extention of “then”, of motion of objects or energy through space.” ~ Lawrence R. Spencer

TOURISTS AT A CRUCIFICXION

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

POSTCARD FROM 37 BCE

Crucifixion was often performed to terrorize and dissuade its witnesses from perpetrating particularly heinous crimes. Victims were left on display after death as warnings to others who might attempt dissent. Crucifixion was usually intended to provide a death that was particularly slow, painful (hence the term excruciating, literally “out of crucifying”), gruesome, humiliating, and public, using whatever means were most expedient for that goal. Crucifixion methods varied considerably with location and time period.

The Greek and Latin words corresponding to “crucifixion” applied to many different forms of painful execution, from impaling on a stake to affixing to a tree, to an upright pole (a crux simplex) or to a combination of an upright (in Latin, stipes) and a crossbeam (in Latin,patibulum).

In some cases, the condemned was forced to carry the crossbeam on his shoulders to the place of execution. A whole cross would weigh well over 300 pounds (135 kg), but the crossbeam would not be quite as burdensome, weighing around 100 pounds. The Roman historian Tacitus records that the city of Rome had a specific place for carrying out executions, situated outside the Esquiline Gate, and had a specific area reserved for the execution of slaves by crucifixion. Upright posts would presumably be fixed permanently in that place, and the crossbeam, with the condemned person perhaps already nailed to it, would then be attached to the post.

While a crucifixion was an execution, it was also a humiliation, by making the condemned as vulnerable as possible. Although artists have depicted the figure on a cross with a loin cloth or a covering of the genitals, writings by Seneca the Younger suggest that victims were crucified completely naked.  When the victim had to urinate or defecate, they had to do so in the open, in view of passers-by, resulting in discomfort and the attraction of insects. Despite its frequent use by the Romans, the horrors of crucifixion did not escape mention by some of their eminent orators. Cicero for example, described crucifixion as “a most cruel and disgusting punishment”, and suggested that “the very mention of the cross should be far removed not only from a Roman citizen’s body, but from his mind, his eyes, his ears.”

Frequently, the legs of the person executed were broken or shattered with an iron club, an act called crurifragium, which was also frequently applied without crucifixion to slaves. This act hastened the death of the person but was also meant to deter those who observed the crucifixion from committing offenses.  — REFERENCE SOURCE:  Wikipedia.org

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE OVER THE RAINBOW & QUANTUM LEAP

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

 To go Down The Rabbit Hole is to enter a period of chaos or confusion.  The expression is an allusion to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, published in 1865.

Over the rainbow” is a state of total, irrevocable madness or delusion.  The phrase is from the film “The Wizard of Oz“, in which Dorothy is transported into another world entirely unconnected from her reality.  The film is based on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,an American children’s novel written by author L. Frank Baum in 1900.

A “Quantum Leap” is when you find yourself in the middle of a situation where you have no idea what is going on, but everyone else around you assumes you do.

The term “quantum leap” is a reference to the TV show of the same name where the lead character is trapped in time and travels therein by leaping into the body of someone in the past, but having no idea who he is or why he is there. In order to leave the body, the lead character must figure out what “situation/conflict” must be resolved or wrong must be righted by the host body. The people around him assume he is the person whose body he occupies, so anything he does, the people around him think it is the host body doing it.

Definitions from www.urbandictionary.com