Tag Archives: Gandhi

BEAUTIFUL DELUSION

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leo-tolstoy-quote

Leo Tolstoy (9 September, 1828 – 20 November, 1910), was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright and philosopher who primarily wrote novels and short stories. Tolstoy was a master of realistic fiction and is widely considered one of the greatest novelists of all time. Ilya_Repin_-_Leo_TolstoyHe is best known for two long novels, War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877). Tolstoy first achieved literary acclaim in his 20s with his semi-autobiographical trilogy of novels, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852–1856) and Sevastopol Sketches (1855), based on his experiences in the Crimean War. His fiction output also includes two additional novels, dozens of short stories, and several famous novellas, including The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Family Happiness, and Hadji Murad. In addition to novels and short stories, he also wrote plays and philosophical essays on Christianity, nonviolent resistance, art and pacifism.

The Kreutzer Sonata is a novella by Leo Tolstoy, named after Beethoven’s Kreutzer Sonata. The novella was published in 1889 and promptly censored by the Russian authorities. The work is an argument for the ideal of sexual abstinence and an in-depth first-person description of jealous rage.

Tolstoy is equally known for his complicated and paradoxical persona and for his extreme moralistic and ascetic views, which he adopted after a moral crisis and spiritual awakening in the 1870s, after which he also became noted as a moral thinker, social reformer, and Georgist.  His literal interpretation of the ethical teachings of Jesus, centering on the Sermon on the Mount, caused him in later life to become a fervent Christian anarchist and anarcho-pacifist. His ideas on nonviolent resistance, expressed in such works as The Kingdom of God Is Within You, were to have a profound impact on such pivotal 20th-century figures as Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.. 

(source: Wikipedia.org)

POSSIBILITIES

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BARRIERSMohandas Karamchand Gandhi (; 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.  The term Indian Independence Movement encompasses activities and ideas aiming to end first the company rule (East India Company), and then the rule of the British.

Mohandas Gandhi’s storied history of resistance included many stints in jail, starting with a two-month imprisonment in 1907 in South Africa, where he was working to end discrimination against Indians living there. He was arrested for urging them to ignore a law requiring Indians to be registered and fingerprinted. While in jail, Gandhi read Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience”, which would become a major part of his philosophy upon his return to India. Back in his home country, Gandhi was put behind bars several times for his movement to end British rule. In 1922 he was tried for the last time by the British government for “bringing or attempting to excite disaffection towards His Majesty’s Government established by law in British India.” He pleaded guilty to all charges and was sentenced to six years, of which he served two before being released for an emergency appendectomy. India achieved independence on Aug. 15, 1947, five months before Gandhi was assassinated.

Gandhi preached rebellion, launched mass civil disobedience and was repeatedly jailed. When arrested, he pleaded guilty and asked for the severest punishment. In South Africa, the charge against him and his co-workers was proved by witnesses furnished by him. The horror, shame and hardship of jail life, originally a punishment allotted to criminals, scared the Indians. Gandhi removed this fear from their hearts. He was jailed eleven times. Once he was arrested three times within four days. If he had to complete all his jail terms, he would have spent 11 years and 19 days in jail. Occasionally his punishment was reduced and and he altogether spent 6 years and 10 months in prison. At the age of 39, he first entered a jail. He came out of the prison gates for the last time when he was 75.

On 14 and 15 August 1947 the Indian Independence Act was invoked.

YESTERNOW

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Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi  (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence from economic slavery imposed on India by British Imperialism and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world, including Martin Luther King, the American Civil Rights Movement and other leaders of non-violent resistance to oppression. 

30 LESSONS LEARNED BY GANDHI

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Mahatma Gandhi needs no introduction. In India, his name is pronounced with the same sincere respect as the names of the saints. The whole world knows the man who led his country to independence from Britain back in 1947.

  1. First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
  2. If I had no sense of humor, I would long ago have committed suicide.
  3. An eye for eye only ends up making the whole world blind.
  4. The world has enough for everyone’s need, but not enough for everyone’s greed.
  5. The future depends on what you do today.
  6. The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.
  7. The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.
  8. Whatever you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it.
  9. Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes.
  10. The only tyrant I accept in this world is the ’still small voice’ within me.
  11. The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
  12. It has always been a mystery to me how men can feel themselves honoured by the humiliation of their fellow beings.
  13. A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.
  14. ’Love never claims, it ever gives. Love ever suffers, never resents never revenges itself.
  15. Find purpose, the means will follow.
  16. Live simply so that others may simply live.
  17. Anger is the enemy of non-violence and pride is a monster that swallows it up.
  18. It is unwise to be too sure of one’s own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err.
  19. The human voice can never reach the distance that is covered by the still small voice of conscience.
  20. An ounce of patience is worth more than a tonne of preaching.
  21. In a gentle way, you can shake the world.
  22. Nobody can hurt me without my permission.
  23. Where love is, there God is also.
  24. What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans, and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy?
  25. You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.
  26. A man is but the product of his thoughts what he thinks, he becomes.
  27. A ’No’ uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a ’Yes’ merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble.
  28. Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.
  29. ’True beauty lies in purity of the heart.
  30. You must be the change you wish to see in the world.

FEAR – LOVE

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pleasedonotfeedthefears“When I despair, I remember that all through history the ways of truth and love have always won. There have been tyrants, and murderers, and for a time they can seem invincible, but in the end they always fall. Think of it–always.”

“Power is of two kinds. One is obtained by the fear of punishment and the other by acts of love. Power based on love is a thousand times more effective and permanent then the one derived from fear of punishment.”

~ Mahatma Gandhi ~
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I have read and highly recommend the autobiography of the greatest non-violent revolutionary who ever lived: Mahatma Gandhi.  The book is FREE in 25 languages at this website:

http://www.mkgandhi.org/linktoautobio.htm

Mohandas Gandhi — 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of the Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.