Tag Archives: Buddha

EXPERIENCE

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Siddhartha is a novel by Hermann Hesse that deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery of a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha.  The word Siddhartha is made up of two words in Sanskrit language, siddha (achieved) + artha (what was searched for), which together means “he who has found meaning (of existence)” or “he who has attained his goals”. In fact, the Buddha’s own name, before his renunciation, was Siddhartha Gautama, Prince of Kapilavastu. In this book, the Buddha is referred to as “Gotama”.  — Wikipedia.org

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MILAREPA

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MILAREPA

Jetsun Milarepa  (c. 1052 – c. 1135 CE) is generally considered one of Tibet’s most famous yogis and poets.

Milarepa is famous for many of his songs and poems, in which he expresses the profundity of his realization of the dharma. Through the illustration of his own life, Milarepa set for all Buddhists an example of the perfect Bodhisattva, and a model of the incorruptible life of a genuine practitioner of Buddhist Tantrism. His life is an unmistakable testimony to the unity an interdependency of all Buddhist teachings – Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana – for Buddhahood is not attainable if any of the three is lacking. He made it clear to all that poverty is not a kind of deprivation, but rather is a necessary way of emancipating oneself from the tyranny of material possessions; that Tantric practice by no means implies indulgence and laxity, but hard labor, strict discipline, and steadfast perseverance; that without resolute renunciation and uncompromising discipline, as Gautama Buddha Himself stressed, all the sublime ideas and dazzling images depicted in Mahayana and Tantric Buddhism are no better that magnificent illusions.

KALAMA SUTTA

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KALAMA SUTTA

“Believe nothing on the faith of traditions, even though they have been held in honor for many generations, in many places. Do not believe a thing because many people speak of it. Do not believe on the faith of the sages of the past. Do not believe what you yourself have imagined, persuading yourself that some god inspires you. Believe nothing on the sole authority of your masters or priests. After examination, believe what you yourself have tested and found to be rational, and conform your conduct thereto.”

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The Kālāma Sutta is a discourse of the Buddha The “sutta” describes the Buddha, when he passed through the village of Kesaputta and is greeted by its inhabitants, a clan called the Kalamas.  They ask for his advice: they say that many wandering holy men and ascetics pass through, expounding their teachings and criticizing the teachings of others.  Whose teachings should they follow?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalama_Sutta