Tag Archives: The Twilight Zone

TWILIGHT ZONE: HOW TO SERVE MAN

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twilight-zoneThis is one of the best, and possibly prophetic, episodes of Twilight Zone, HOW TO SERVE MAN.  You will never think about “E.T.” the same way again!  The Twilight Zone ran from 1959 until 1964. 

HERE IS A LINK TO 24 EPISODES OF THE TWILIGHT ZONE
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYkG4AyFVMHK4d9VDUH1EwaMrYaAHl3jy

THE OBSOLETE MAN IN THE TWILIGHT ZONE

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This video is a scene from The Twilight Zone episode “The Obsolete Man“.  It is a commentary on how governments destroy the individual, independent intelligence of writers, and other “revolutionaries” who are a huge percentage of the population of Prison Planet Earth.

twilight-zone-e1339129166960“There is a fifth dimension beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man’s fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone.” ~ Rod Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975)

Rod Serling (creator of the 1960’s Sci-Fi TV series “The Twilight Zone“) was a fan of pulp fiction stories. As an adult, he sought topics with themes such as racism, government, war, society, and human nature in general. Serling decided to combine these two interests as a way to broach these subjects on television at a time when such issues were not commonly addressed.

Serling was active in politics, both on and off the screen, and helped form television industry standards. He was known as the “angry young man” of Hollywood, clashing with television executives and sponsors over a wide range of issues including censorship, racism, and war.

Throughout the 1950s, Serling established himself as one of the most popular names in television. He was as famous for writing televised drama as he was for criticizing the medium’s limitations. His most vocal complaints concerned censorship, which was frequently practiced by sponsors and networks.

“I was not permitted to have my senators discuss any current or pressing problem,” he said of his 1957 production ‘The Arena’, intended to be an involving look into contemporary politics. To talk of tariff was to align oneself with the Republicans; to talk of labor was to suggest control by the Democrats. To say a single thing germane to the current political scene was absolutely prohibited.”

The Twilight Zone‍‍ ’​‍s writers frequently used science fiction as a vehicle for social comment, as networks and sponsors who censored controversial material from live dramas were less concerned with seemingly innocuous fantasy and sci-fi stories. Frequent themes on The Twilight Zone included nuclear war, McCarthyism, and mass hysteria, subjects that were avoided on more serious primetime television.  Aside from Rod Serling, who wrote or adapted nearly two-thirds of the series’ total episodes, writers for The Twilight Zone included leading authors such as Charles Beaumont, Ray Bradbury, Earl Hamner, Jr., George Clayton Johnson, Richard Matheson, Reginald Rose, and Jerry Sohl. Many episodes also featured new adaptations of classic stories by such writers as Ambrose Bierce, Jerome Bixby, Damon Knight, John Collier, and Lewis Padgett.