LIFE, UNIVERSES AND OTHER STUFF
6May/14Off

THE ETERNALLY BENEVOLENT DOMAIN

A Science Fiction story based on the best selling book ALIEN INTERVIEW.Domain Expeditionary Force Rescue Mission

"There are several obvious reasons that The Domain, and other space civilizations do not land on Earth or make their presence known. It takes a very brave IS-BE to come down through the atmosphere and land on Earth, because it is a prison planet, with a very uncontrolled, psychotic population. And, no IS-BE is entirely proof against the risk of entrapment, as with the members of The Domain Expeditionary Force who were captured in the Himalayas 8,200 years ago."

Army Air Force Nurse, Matilda MacElroy interviewed the pilot of the UFO that crashed at Roswell, NM in 1947, who revealed that 3,000 members of "The Domain" were attacked and captured by forces of the Old Empire in 5,965 BCE. They were given amnesia and sent to Earth to live as humans. The Domain Force deployed a mission to contact and recover these lost personnel from Earth. Amnesia / thought control mechanisms are installed around Earth to ensure that it remains a secret prison planet under the control of the Brothers of The Serpent. The Domain desires that all IS-BEs of Earth will eventually be recovered to their natural spiritual state of independence, power and immortality, as embodied in the Eternally Benevolent Domain, by the principle of "All-Mother, and in the entity of "The Omniscient and Omnipotent Matriarch".

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DEF RESCUE MISSION

LISTEN TO A SAMPLE OF THE  AUDIOBOOK  The Domain Expeditionary Force Rescue Mission

 

29Apr/14Off

STATES OF SUPERSTITION

The idea that human beings in biological bodies can travel throughout intergalactic space, raise families on board a space craft, and freely interact with alien life forms is an example of superstition, based in science fiction, conjecture and wishful thinking....
HIGHER STATES OF STUPIDSTITION

LET'S TRY TO FORGET ABOUT THE HISTORY OF HUMAN SUPERSTITION AND STUPIDITY

AND PRETEND THAT WE HAVE EVOLVED INTO HIGHER STATES OF SUPERSTITION.

6Nov/13Off

READ WHAT THE MASTER READS

826525Since I received and published the interview transcripts from the late Nurse Matilda MacElroy, which I published in the non-fiction book  Alien Interview,  I have become a great fan of  E. E. "Doc" Smith,  (May 2, 1890 – August 31, 1965) an American science fiction author, best known for the Lensman and Skylark series.  He is sometimes called the father of "space opera".

After reading these two series of books, and a few others by the same writer, I can understand why Doc Smith was an influence of the iconic writers and film makers such as George Lucas, who reveals in his biography, that the Lensman novels were a major influence on his youth.   And, J. Michael Straczynski, creator of the science fiction television series Babylon 5, also has acknowledged the influence of the Lensman books. Sir Arthur C. Clarke's space battle in Earthlight was based on the attack on the Mardonalian fortress in chapter seven of Skylark ThreeSuperman-creator Jerry Siegel was impressed, at an early age, with the optimistic vision of the future presented in Skylark of Space.  Ron Howard's Imagine Entertainment and Universal Studios are in negotiation with the Smith estate for an 18-month film rights option on the series.

In order to gain a greater understanding of his books, and the amazing science and philosophical points of view revealed by "The Master", Doc Smith, I thought it would be a good idea to read some of the books that influenced "The Master".  Read the works of "The Master", but also read what "The Master" has read.

In his 1947 essay "The Epic of Space”, E.E. "Doc" Smith listed (by last name only) authors he enjoyed reading:

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John W. CampbellL. Sprague de CampRobert A. HeinleinMurray LeinsterH. P. LovecraftA. Merritt (specifically The Ship of IshtarThe Moon PoolThe Snake Mother, and Dwellers in the Mirage, as well as the character John Kenton), C.L. Moore (specifically Jirel of Joiry), Roman Frederick StarzlJohn TaineA.E. van VogtStanley G. Weinbaum (specifically Tweerl), and Jack Williamson. In a passage on his preparation for writing the Lensman novels, he notes that Clinton Constantinescu's "War of the Universe" was not a masterpiece, but says that Starzl and Williamson were masters; this suggests that Starzl's Interplanetary Flying Patrol may have been an influence on Smith's Triplanetary Patrol, later the Galactic Patrol.  The feeding of the Overlords of Delgon upon the life-force of their victims at the end of chapter five of Galactic Patrol seems a clear allusion to chapter twenty-nine of The Moon Pool; Merritt's account of the Taithu and the power of love in chapters twenty-nine and thirty-four also bear some resemblance to the end of Children of the Lens. Smith also mentions Edgar Rice Burroughs, complaining about loose ends at the end of one of his novels.

Smith's daughter, Verna, lists the following authors as visitors to the Smith household in her youth: Lloyd Arthur Eshbach, Robert HeinleinDave KyleBob Tucker, Williamson, Frederik Pohl, Merritt, and the Galactic Roamers. Smith cites Bigelow's Theoretical Chemistry–Fundamentals as a justification for the possibility of the inertialess drive. There is also an extended reference to Rudyard Kipling's "Ballad of Boh Da Thone” in Gray Lensman (chapter 22, "Regeneration,” in a conversation between Kinnison and MacDougall).

Sam Moskowitz's biographical essay on Smith in Seekers of Tomorrow states that he regularly read Argosy magazine, and everything by H.G. Wells,Jules VerneH. Rider HaggardEdgar Allan Poe, and Edgar Rice Burroughs. Moskowitz also notes that Smith's "reading enthusiasms included poetry, philosophy, ancient and medieval history, and all of English literature."

Sourcehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._E._Smith#Family_and_education